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You Can Have Your Fish and Eat Them Too

You Can Have Your Fish and Eat Them Too

This article promotes the idea of Marine Reserves. I think this is an idea whose time has come. This is similiar to the model used in the Sea Scallop fishery, but you might say they have more of a crop rotation model.

Catch Shares Save Fishermen and Fish

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Catch Shares Save Fishermen and Fish



Great article about how catch shares may help.

Flathead Minnows do not Need Prozac

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Small fish, big opportunity - KansasCity.com

Small fish, big opportunity - KansasCity.com


Small fish, big opportunityBy PETER BAKER AND PAUL SHIVELY By PETER BAKER AND PAUL SHIVELY Updated: 2012-10-25T12:10:40Z Sometimes the environmental challenges facing our oceans seem so large that it's hard to know where to start solving them. Changes in climate, degradation of habitat and rising demand to feed an ever-growing world population are just a few of the daunting ocean-related problems our nation faces. Over the past several months, however, a collection of conservationists, anglers and others have come together to urge federal policymakers to safeguard the array of species that serve as the foundation for a healthy marine ecosystem. And, to their credit, regional fishery managers on both coasts heeded the message these advocates delivered: If we want to protect the oceans, it makes sense to start small. Species such as menhaden, sardines and herring - commonly known as forage fish - are the lifeblood of a h…

Record Fish Catch

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U.S. seafood catch at 17-year high
Last year's increase, up 23% by weight over 2010 levels, is evidence that fish populations are rebuilding. Still, a number of fisheries remain in trouble.
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Scallopers Facing Reduction

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Thursday, September 20, 2012Scallopers facing 30 percent catch reduction in each of the next two years | SouthCoastToday.com Scallopers facing 30 percent catch reduction in each of the next two years | SouthCoastToday.com

NEW BEDFORD — The scallop catch could be cut up to 30 percent in each of the next two years in what fishermen say would be a heavy blow to the industry. Deirdre Boelke, a scallop plan coordinator with the New England Fishery Management Council, said the reductions are needed because fewer full-grown scallops are available for harvest. "The projected catch for 2013 and 2014 is in the neighborhood of 40 million pounds," Boelke told The Standard-Times after a meeting of the council's Scallop Oversight Committee in New Bedford on Tuesday. That's down from just under 57 million pounds in 2011, the latest full-year figures available. "It's a big hit that will affect everyone," said boat owner William Wells of Seaford, Va., who chairs the scal…