Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Wild Edible Seafood Update

Good day Chefs and Buyers,
 
Local fluke landings are stronger than ever and prices are coming down. Fluke are available in all sizes from 2-8lbs. Boats fill up quick, so these fish are just hours out of the water. After a tough winter with lobster prices staying high there is a bit of relief in the market with many big lobster houses interested in moving inventory from their pounds. Warmer weather will start to increase catches before the demand catches up, so we hope to see additional relief in the future.
 
Spanish mackerel are sushi grade in rigor fish. Bluefish availability has been sporadic at best, but we have some nice "snapper" blues 2-4lbs in today. Tuesday's turbot shipments from Chile are back on line and the fish are as nice as ever. Hiramasa is new from Australia, and boy are these fish nice and fatty. We have whitefish from the great lakes today, and carp is available for those planning to make gefilte fish.
 
Large farmed stripe bass will be very limited or unavailable until Friday, please let us know if you would like a sub when you place your order. We have plenty of wild striped bass and small farmed bass.
 
Also available: Sturgeon, escolar, tile, grouper, and halibut.
 
 
"When I was little, my grandfather used to make me stand in a closet for five minutes without moving. He said it was elevator practice."
~Stephen Wright

March 23, 1857 is the day Elisha Otis installed the first steam-driven passenger elevator. His elevator transported people up and down a five-story department store on Broadway in New York City. Elisha Otis didn't actually invent the elevator. He invented the brakes -

"A patent, or invention, is any assemblage of technologies or ideas that you can put together that nobody put together that way before. That's how the patent office defines it. That's an invention."
~Dean Kamen

Have a great day,


Matthew Hovey http://www.linkedin.com/in/matthewhovey
718-433-4321 ext.121 / fax 718-433-4616 cell 718-679-0641
"Hand picked specialties from the Seas"
www.wildedibles.com 
http://sustainablefishmonger.com

No comments: